Nemosine Singularity Demo (4)

Updated 2/13/16, 2/19/16, 2/29/16
1. Nemosine Singularity Fountain Pen Fine German Nib Demonstrator
Appearance & construction: stars4-h021
Writing: stars4-5-100

Nemosine Singularity Fountain Pen Fine German Nib Demonstrator NEM-SIN-01-F $14.99 FS from Nemosine 1/3/16.

Nemosine Singularity Fountain Pen Fine German Nib Demonstrator NEM-SIN-01-F $14.99 FS from Nemosine 1/3/16. Arrived 1/16/16.

2. Nemosine Singularity Demonstrator Fountain Pen – Fine German Nib XFP 2/19/16 $14.99 [gift to B] Arrived 2/29/16

3. Nemosine Singularity Demonstrator Magenta Fountain Pen – Fine German Nib XFP 2/19/16 $14.99 [gift to E] Arrived 2/29/16

4. Singularity Onyx Demonstrator Fountain Pen – Fine German Nib XFP 2/19/16 $14.99 Arrived 2/29/16

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JGA, “Nemosine Singularity/fission: What’s The Catch?” (FPN 2/23/14): “To add to the mix, I’ve since switch to Jinhao pens for writing with ‘low end’ pens.  These are less expensive than Singularity, have a more solid feel, and if you transpose the Singularity nib, feed and converter into the Jinhao you get one hell of a pen.”

Difference/similarity between the Singularity and the Fission: The Fission is metal and the Singularity is plastic.

The following quotes are from the FPN thread cited above:

Indigoskye: “The nibs are interchangable between the two styles of pen.”

KBeezie: “What I ended up doing was putting the 1.5 Stub nib on my Jinhao X450, then I took the 2-tone Jinhao Medium Nib and put it on the Nemosine Singularity since it takes the same #6 nib that the Jinhao X450, X750, 159, etc takes…. I’m planning on getting some silica gel though since I could use the Singularity as an eye-dropper pen, I’m just more concerned about it’s durability than anything. And from what I understood, the Fission is the same as the Singularity, except metal instead of plastic.”

markleewebb: “Only problem I have noted is it’s easy to scratch the finish on the pen – after just a few writing sessions I hd concentric ring scratches all around top of pen where you screw it on to post. Other than that it’s a great pen.”

Bookman: “The red one sports a recently-purchased Goulet #6 EF nib and is using a converter; the demonstrator, filled with BSB in ED mode, has a stock F. Both pens have done regular duty as eyedroppers. I have never had any problems with leakage or with erratic flow when the ink volume has gotten low. In fact, when in ED mode I have never had any problems of any kind that resulted from the conversion.”

xFountainPens.com: Nemosine #6 Fountain Pen Nib, $6.99; German-made fountain pen with stainless steel nib and iridium point; available in EF, F, M, 0.6mm and 0.8mm calligraphy; compatible with Nemosine Singularity and Nemosine Fission fountain pen models; not compatible with the Nemosine Neutrino.

1/16/16: Amazon/Nemosine: Nemosine German Medium Nib. $6.99 + $3.90 shipping. For my destination (Hawaii), the shipping is a bit cheaper than xFountainPens.

  • * * *

OBSERVATIONS

1: Don’t leave this pen standing on its head. The ink will drip into the cap, creating a mess. This is true for the Singularity, but it also happened with the Fission to a lesser extent.

2: Don’t use the Singularity with cap posted, as Markleewebb (above) cautions, because the cap will permanently scratch the barrel. I haven’t experienced this, but I’m guessing he’s correct because there’s no lining in the cap and the barrel isn’t set up with threads, bumps, or rims that will absorb or cushion the sharp threads on the inside of the cap.

3: This is a beautiful demonstrator. Compared to the industrial look of the Fission, the clear demonstrator Singularity is extremely stylish.

4: The designers ought to consider adding a steel band of threads to the posting end of the barrel — like the Fission. This will keep the cap securely posted while protecting the surface of the barrel. An alternative is to add bumps, like the Pilot Petit1, in this location to achieve the same purpose.

5: I like the fact that the cap doesn’t include a liner. Makes it easier to clean when ink leaks into the cap. The Pilot Petit1 has a liner, and ink will get in-between the liner and the inside of the cap. Getting that ink out is a huge task.

6: The designers ought to consider replacing the black section with a clear alternative. Also, a clear feed would be nice, too.

7: I immediately thought eyedropper when I saw this pen. I’ll need to search for comments by those who have tried it. My experience with the Pilot Petit1 was a disaster, so I’m wary about trying it on the Singularity. But the Singularity seems to be a better test pen because, if it leaks, the interior of the cap can be cleaned.

8: I test my pens on three types of paper: Mead green tint steno tablet paper, Mead letter-writing tablet paper,  and standard printer paper. The Nemosine EF nib is just too dry and thin for any of these. The F is too thin for the steno and barely passable on the letter, but it’s good on the printer The M is great on the steno and letter, but too wet on the printer.

9: I’m seriously considering nib changes. As others have noted, the Fission and Singularity use the same nibs. I’m planning to get a couple of medium nibs for the Black Fission, which has an EF nib, and, possibly, for the Singularity, which has a F nib. The F seems to be a compromise that sort of works with all three types of paper that I’ve been using in my tests. I’ll have to wait and see about switching the Singularity nib.

10: Some are using these Nemosine nibs on their China pens (Jinhao). Makes sense, since they end up with a Nemosine writing instrument in a Chinese pen with a solid brass body and beautiful enameling. For those who aren’t too impressed with the Fission’s industrial look or the Singularity’s suspected flimsiness, this would be an interesting mod.

11. Update 2/13/16: Done. All three Nemosines are now M.

12. Update 2/19/16: The M is OK, but I’m swinging away from the M. Too wet. Prefer the F. Ordered a bunch of Nemosine Fs.

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